Jump to content
Announcement
  • Welcome to all new and returning Rurlife.com subscribers!
  • Have something on your mind? Sign up today, it's easy and free. Wa want to hear from you!
  • In an effort to combat an increase of attempts by SPAM accounts to sign up, some of them successful, increased security measures are in place. We apologize for the inconvenience to our new members.
Rurlife.com

Are You A Locavore?

Recommended Posts

Rurlife.com    12

Are you concerned about where your food comes from? Do you seek out fresh, seasonal, locally grown produce, meats, and other foods? Chances are you are well on your way to becoming a locavore.

What is a locavore, exactly? The root of the term lies in the word “local.” It means being conscious of the distance between where food is produced and where it is consumed. A locavore is a person who strives to eat foods grown and produced within a one hundred-mile radius, though the actual distance is determined by what is realistic for you.

It’s not only about distance. It’s also about economics and sustainability. Foods on North American plates may travel thousands of miles from farm to fork. Shipping foods over long distances requires more fuel for transportation (consider the air pollution), while buying products close to home supports local farmers and ranchers, builds com- munity, and helps the local economy. Buying from local farmers allows them to experiment with new varieties of fruits and vegetables better suited to the climate and local environment. Building a local market for their meats allows ranchers to raise their animals in an environmentally sound way.

Buying locally ensures that foods will be fresher and more nutritious. Local produce doesn’t have   to stand up to the rigors of shipping. When grown nearby, melons are allowed more time to ripen on the vine, and corn tastes sweeter when picked the day you eat it.

Read the rest here 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Chris    1,212

We're probably not as much as we could be, but we sure contribute a fair amount. Of course when your family gardens, has chickens, honeybees, etc., how much do you need to buy?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
KarenK    111

I am if it's at all possible.  Since I'm not much for canning or freezing, this time of year I'm buying frozen everything but as soon as local produce of any kind is available I'm there.

My beef is local as is my venison and eggs ( :) )  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
KarenK    111
7 minutes ago, Chris said:

Freezing veggies is pretty easy ya know.

They always get freezer burnt before I use them and the rubber seal on my seal a meal thingy needs replaced.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ann    339

When buying frozen vegetables I check to see where produced.  If it’s Mexico or points further south I don’t buy.  I’m not sure about those countries use of pesticides.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Chris    1,212

Well anymore it seems like no where is safe. Pesticides from here, E. coli from there...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×